Our research and insight
for a changing world.

Our research and insight
for a changing world.

 
 

Our research and insight
for a changing world.

 
 

Our research and insight
for a changing world.

 
 

Our research and insight for a changing world.
 
 

Modern Ageing

Boomers currently account for 50% of all consumer purchases.

Boomers, (those born between mid 1940s and mid 1960s) have always occupied a comparatively larger presence on the market against other generations; no other generation compares in scale and spending power. Now that they are approaching the 75 + ‘Elderly’ category the old rules for ageing will not do.

This generation invented tech, pushed cultural norms and are unlikely to settle for less just because they’ve entered a new stage of life. They control way over half the disposable income and yet 90% of them feel products are simply not aimed at them.

In this piece we examine the ways in which Boomers are set to start a brand new revolution in the market for ‘senior products’ and how companies, with few exceptions, are failing to capitalise on this abundant, exuberant and affluent sector.

More than 700 million people will use a health app this year.

The last decade has seen an incredible transformation in the information we are able to access, changing the way we live and the choices we are able to make forever.

This has enabled a shift in impetus from reactive to personalised pro-active healthcare which, in turn, places emphasis on individual responsibility for wellbeing.  In short, whereas healthcare used to mean a trip to the doctor for diagnosis and then treatment, two new steps have been front-loaded; Prevention and Monitoring.

In this piece we consider both the positive and negative impact this is having on consumers and how brands are facing a new set of expectations and concerns from the digitally engaged which they must address to stay ahead. 

More than 700 million people will use a health app this year.

The last decade has seen an incredible transformation in the information we are able to access, changing the way we live and the choices we are able to make forever.

This has enabled a shift in impetus from reactive to personalised pro-active healthcare which, in turn, places emphasis on individual responsibility for wellbeing.  In short, whereas healthcare used to mean a trip to the doctor for diagnosis and then treatment, two new steps have been front-loaded; Prevention and Monitoring.

In this piece we consider both the positive and negative impact this is having on consumers and how brands are facing a new set of expectations and concerns from the digitally engaged which they must address to stay ahead. 

More than 700 million people will use a health app this year.

The last decade has seen an incredible transformation in the information we are able to access, changing the way we live and the choices we are able to make forever.

This has enabled a shift in impetus from reactive to personalised pro-active healthcare which, in turn, places emphasis on individual responsibility for wellbeing.  In short, whereas healthcare used to mean a trip to the doctor for diagnosis and then treatment, two new steps have been front-loaded; Prevention and Monitoring.

In this piece we consider both the positive and negative impact this is having on consumers and how brands are facing a new set of expectations and concerns from the digitally engaged which they must address to stay ahead. 

Digital Health

More than 700 million people will use a health app this year.

The last decade has seen an incredible transformation in the information we are able to access, changing the way we live and the choices we are able to make forever.

This has enabled a shift in impetus from reactive to personalised pro-active healthcare which, in turn, places emphasis on individual responsibility for wellbeing.  In short, whereas healthcare used to mean a trip to the doctor for diagnosis and then treatment, two new steps have been front-loaded; Prevention and Monitoring.

In this piece we consider both the positive and negative impact this is having on consumers and how brands are facing a new set of expectations and concerns from the digitally engaged which they must address to stay ahead. 

More than 700 million people will use a health app this year.

The last decade has seen an incredible transformation in the information we are able to access, changing the way we live and the choices we are able to make forever.

This has enabled a shift in impetus from reactive to personalised pro-active healthcare which, in turn, places emphasis on individual responsibility for wellbeing.  In short, whereas healthcare used to mean a trip to the doctor for diagnosis and then treatment, two new steps have been front-loaded; Prevention and Monitoring.

In this piece we consider both the positive and negative impact this is having on consumers and how brands are facing a new set of expectations and concerns from the digitally engaged which they must address to stay ahead. 

More than 700 million people will use a health app this year.

The last decade has seen an incredible transformation in the information we are able to access, changing the way we live and the choices we are able to make forever.

This has enabled a shift in impetus from reactive to personalised pro-active healthcare which, in turn, places emphasis on individual responsibility for wellbeing.  In short, whereas healthcare used to mean a trip to the doctor for diagnosis and then treatment, two new steps have been front-loaded; Prevention and Monitoring.

In this piece we consider both the positive and negative impact this is having on consumers and how brands are facing a new set of expectations and concerns from the digitally engaged which they must address to stay ahead. 

More than 700 million people will use a health app this year.

The last decade has seen an incredible transformation in the information we are able to access, changing the way we live and the choices we are able to make forever.

This has enabled a shift in impetus from reactive to personalised pro-active healthcare which, in turn, places emphasis on individual responsibility for wellbeing.  In short, whereas healthcare used to mean a trip to the doctor for diagnosis and then treatment, two new steps have been front-loaded; Prevention and Monitoring.

In this piece we consider both the positive and negative impact this is having on consumers and how brands are facing a new set of expectations and concerns from the digitally engaged which they must address to stay ahead. 

Urbanisation

60% of the World’s population will live in cities by 2030. 

Rapidly accelerating urbanisation is shaping the present as well as the future and old patterns of consumer behaviour are changing already as housing, infrastructure, health and transport are placed under increasing pressure.

Simply put, there will be less and less space and more and more people in cities in the future, and so consumers will be making decisions about what they buy based on a different set of criteria.

In this piece we explore the ways in which consumer reaction to urbanisation is currently impacting today’s market, weigh up future forecasts and consider the ways in which brands must adapt now to survive.

More than 700 million people will use a health app this year.

The last decade has seen an incredible transformation in the information we are able to access, changing the way we live and the choices we are able to make forever.

This has enabled a shift in impetus from reactive to personalised pro-active healthcare which, in turn, places emphasis on individual responsibility for wellbeing.  In short, whereas healthcare used to mean a trip to the doctor for diagnosis and then treatment, two new steps have been front-loaded; Prevention and Monitoring.

In this piece we consider both the positive and negative impact this is having on consumers and how brands are facing a new set of expectations and concerns from the digitally engaged which they must address to stay ahead. 

More than 700 million people will use a health app this year.

The last decade has seen an incredible transformation in the information we are able to access, changing the way we live and the choices we are able to make forever.

This has enabled a shift in impetus from reactive to personalised pro-active healthcare which, in turn, places emphasis on individual responsibility for wellbeing.  In short, whereas healthcare used to mean a trip to the doctor for diagnosis and then treatment, two new steps have been front-loaded; Prevention and Monitoring.

In this piece we consider both the positive and negative impact this is having on consumers and how brands are facing a new set of expectations and concerns from the digitally engaged which they must address to stay ahead. 

More than 700 million people will use a health app this year.

The last decade has seen an incredible transformation in the information we are able to access, changing the way we live and the choices we are able to make forever.

This has enabled a shift in impetus from reactive to personalised pro-active healthcare which, in turn, places emphasis on individual responsibility for wellbeing.  In short, whereas healthcare used to mean a trip to the doctor for diagnosis and then treatment, two new steps have been front-loaded; Prevention and Monitoring.

In this piece we consider both the positive and negative impact this is having on consumers and how brands are facing a new set of expectations and concerns from the digitally engaged which they must address to stay ahead. 

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St Albans, Hertfordshire
AL3 4EH, United Kingdom

Get in touch

T: +44 (0)1727 856300
studio@equalsdesign.com

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